воскресенье, 16 сентября 2012 г.

Study results from University of British Columbia, Children's and Women's Health Center of British Columbia update understanding of pediatric research.(Report) - Pediatrics Week

Research findings, 'Inflammatory response in preterm infants is induced early in life by oxygen and modulated by total parenteral nutrition,' are discussed in a new report. According to recent research from Vancouver, Canada, 'The i.v. lipid emulsion (LIP) is a source of oxidants, which may stimulate inflammation. Coadministration of parenteral multivitamins (MVP) with LIP prevents lipid peroxidation in light-exposed total parenteral nutrition (TPN).'

'We hypothesized that this modality of TPN administration affects systemic inflammation, which may be modulated by exposure to oxygen. Premature infants were allocated to three TPN regimens: control regimen -MVP coadministered with amino acid/dextrose exposed to ambient light, LIP provided separately (n=9) -LIP+MVP light exposed (LE): MVP coadministered with light-exposed LIP (n=9) -LIP+MVP light protected (LP): MVP coadministered with light-protected LIP (n=8). In LE and LP, amino acid/dextrose was provided separately. On reaching full TPN, infants were sampled for IL-6 and IL-8 in plasma and the redox potential of glutathione in whole blood (E, mV). Data were compared (ANOVA) in infants exposed to low (<0.25) versus high (>or=0.25) FiO2. Patients (mean [+ or -]SD: birth weight 797 [+ or -]172 g; GA 26 [+ or -]1 wk) had similar clinical characteristics in TPN groups. Cytokine levels correlated positively (p <0.01) with FiO2 and E. High FiO2 stimulated an increase (p <0.01) in cytokines in control regimen, whereas these markers remained unaffected by oxygen in the LE and LP groups,' wrote P.M. Lavoie and colleagues, University of British Columbia, Children's and Women's Health Center of British Columbia.

The researchers concluded: 'The choice of a TPN admixture may have important consequences on the systemic inflammatory response triggered by an oxidant stress.'

Lavoie and colleagues published their study in Pediatric Research (Inflammatory response in preterm infants is induced early in life by oxygen and modulated by total parenteral nutrition. Pediatric Research, 2010;68(3):248-51).

For additional information, contact P.M. Lavoie, University of British Columbia, Division of Neonatology, Children's and Women's Health Centre of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Keywords: City:Vancouver, Country:Canada, Alternative Medicine, Amino Acids, Chalcogens, Diet and Nutrition, Feeding Methods, Gases, Human, Inflammation, Nutrition Therapy, Nutritional Support, Oxygen, Pediatric Research, Pediatrics, Peptides, Proteins, Therapeutics, Total Parenteral Nutrition, Treatment.

This article was prepared by Pediatrics Week editors from staff and other reports. Copyright 2010, Pediatrics Week via NewsRx.com.