пятница, 28 сентября 2012 г.

Data on pediatric surgery in children discussed by researchers at Keio University, Department of Pediatric Surgery.(Report) - Health & Medicine Week

Fresh data on pediatric surgery are presented in the report 'Transileocolic venous balloon dilatation for the management of primary and recurrent portal venous stenosis after living donor liver transplantation in children.' According to a study from Tokyo, Japan, 'Portal venous stenosis is relatively a rare complication after liver transplantation in children and it sometimes leads to life threatening event due to gastrointestinal bleeding or graft failure (see also Pediatric Surgery). Recently, balloon dilatation has been widely accepted as a treatment of choice for the management of portal venous stenosis.'

'The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of transileocolic venous balloon dilatation for the management of primary and recurrent portal venous stenosis after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in children. The records of 57 pediatric liver transplants were retrospectively reviewed. Nine patients (15.8%) with portal venous stenosis were identified. Seven symptomatic children with portal venous stenosis underwent balloon dilatation. Two approaches were employed for balloon dilatation; the transileocolic venous approach and the percutaneous transhepatic approach. In patients with recurrent stenosis, careful follow-up was carried out while they were asymptomatic. Twelve balloon dilatations were performed in seven children with primary or recurrent portal venous stenoses. The initial technical success rate was 91.7% (11/12), while 6 out of 12 (50.0%) procedures resulted in recurrent stenosis. Five out of six recurrent stenoses required repeated balloon dilatation. The clinical success rate of balloon dilatation in our study was 85.7% (6/7). Other than recurrent stenosis, two procedure-related complications occurred,' wrote R. Hotta and colleagues, Keio University, Department of Pediatric Surgery.

The researchers concluded: 'Transileocolic venous balloon dilatation was a safe and effective procedure for portal venous stenosis after LDLT in children.'

Hotta and colleagues published the results of their research in Pediatric Surgery International (Transileocolic venous balloon dilatation for the management of primary and recurrent portal venous stenosis after living donor liver transplantation in children. Pediatric Surgery International, 2007;23(10):939-45).

For additional information, contact R. Hotta, Keio University School of Medicine, Dept. of Pediatric Surgery, 35, Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-8582, Japan.

The publisher of the journal Pediatric Surgery International can be contacted at: Springer, 233 Spring Street, New York, NY 10013, USA.

Keywords: Japan, Tokyo, Angiology, Bioengineering, Biomedical Engineering, Biomedicine, Gastroenterology, Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Liver Transplant, Living Donors, Organ Transplant, Pediatric Surgery, Stenosis, Therapy, Transplantation, Treatment.

This article was prepared by Health & Medicine Week editors from staff and other reports. Copyright 2008, Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com.